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How do you describe the pollen grain under the microscope?

How do you describe the pollen grain under the microscope?

When viewed under the stereo microscope, pollen grains will appear as grossly shaped, irregular structures/particles. However, the shape and appearance of the grains will vary depending on the type of pollen under investigation. For untreated grains, there is poor contrast compared to treated pollen grains.

What is the magnification used to observe the pollen grain?

Microscope power A compound microscope of 100 times overall magnification is needed to see pollen grains. With a x100 microscope you will just be able to see the grains of pollen. Using x400 you will be able to see some identifying features.

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What is magnification and resolution?

Key Points. Magnification is the ability to make small objects seem larger, such as making a microscopic organism visible. Resolution is the ability to distinguish two objects from each other. Light microscopy has limits to both its resolution and its magnification.

How does microscope achieve magnification and resolution?

In simple magnification, light from an object passes through a biconvex lens and is bent (refracted) towards your eye. Including more lenses doesn’t change the basic principle of how a microscope magnifies but it does enable higher magnifications and gives a better quality image.

How do you identify a pollen grain?

Surface Structures The majority of pollen grains can be identified by surface structures in the sexine, the most distinctive being ap- ertures: pores and furrows (Fig 4). Ad- ditionally, projections off the grain surface may be characteristic, as may be ridge patterns on the pollen surface.

How does a pollen grain look like?

pollen looks like a fine yellow or white dust, but when magnified many thousands of times in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) each plant pollen species reveals a unique set of characteristics. They can be distinguished by shape, size and ornamentation.

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Can you see pollen under a microscope?

W hen viewed with a dissecting microscope, pollen looks like a fine yellow or white dust, but when magnified many thousands of times in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) each plant pollen species reveals a unique set of characteristics. They can be distinguished by shape, size and ornamentation.

How does magnification and resolution affect the appearance of objects viewed under the microscope?

They do this by making things appear bigger (magnifying them) and at the same time increasing the amount of detail we can see (increasing our ability to distinguish between two objects or ‘resolve’ them).

How do magnification and resolution differ in electron and light microscopes?

There are two main types of microscope: light microscopes are used to study living cells and for regular use when relatively low magnification and resolution is enough. electron microscopes provide higher magnifications and higher resolution images but cannot be used to view living cells.

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How does magnification affect resolution?

The true resolution improvement comes from the NA increase and not increases in magnification. Optical resolution is solely dependent on the objective lenses whereas, digital resolution is dependent on the objective lens, digital camera sensor and monitor and are closely tied together in system performance.

What is a pollen grain made of?

Pollen grains are microscopic structures that carry the male reproductive cell of plants. The inside of the grain contains cytoplasm along with the tube cell (which becomes the pollen tube) and the generative cell (which releases the sperm nuclei). The outer shell is made of two layers.

What does a pollen grain contain?

Each pollen grain is a single cell containing two male gametes. Once mature, the anther splits open and pollen is released. Both male gametes are involved in fertilisation, resulting in formation of a zygote and an endosperm. This process of double fertilisation is unique to flowering plants.